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Our History

This is a reprint from a 1916 Association conference publication.

Chief ClaryThe New York State Association of Chiefs of Police was founded in 1901. The idea of such an organization finding its inception in the mind of Joseph P. Cleary, Chief of Police, Rochester, who discovering that the sentiment he vice was felt by many others, succeeded in gathering together the chiefs of the police departments of several cities and villages of this State, to warrant the calling of a meeting to formulate plans to place the organization on a definite footing and this meeting, the first one in the History of the Association, was held in that city on Saturday, November 30, 1901.

In acceptance of an invitation extended by Chief of Police Joseph P. Cleary of Rochester, there assembled in that city on Saturday, November 30, 1901, chiefs of the police departments of the several cities and villages of this State.

Present at the meeting were these chiefs: William Dinan, Niagara Falls; John F. Ryan, North Tonawanda; George H. McGlynn, Ogdensburg; Joseph P. Cleary, Rochester; Charles F. Cleveland, Utica; William Coughlin, Troy; H. G. Beeman, Canandaigua; James Ryan, Corning; J. F. Sherber, Gloversville; Frank J. Cassada, Elmira; Charles E. McMaster, Auburn; Daniel Kane, Geneva; Charles A. Barry, Rome; Ewing E. Barnes, Cortland; John O'Day, Tonawanda; William S. Bull, superintendent of police, Buffalo; James A. Taggert, secretary police department, Buffalo; Charles Molyneux, Lockport.

The meeting was called to order in the common council chamber of Chief cleary, who introduced Mayor Carnahan. The mayor graciously welcomed the visitors to his city and warmly commended the purpose animating the gathering.

Chief Cleary was unanimously chosen as the temporary presiding officer, and Chief Cleveland was in the same manner selected as temporary secretary.

On motion of Chief Cleveland, the chair was authorized to name a committee of five to perfect a permanent organization. The chair designated as such committee: Chief Cleveland of Utica; Superintendent Bull, of Buffalo; Chief Cassada, of Elmira; Chief McMaster, of Auburn; Chief Dinan, of Niagara Falls.

The committee on permanent organization, after due deliberation, reported in favor of a permanent organization; that the officers of such organization be a president, vice-president and secretary and treasurer; that stated meetings be held four times in each year; that the dues of members of the association be fixed at the sum of $2.50 per year; that the next meeting of the association be held in the city of Utica; that the officers of the association for the first year be: President, Joseph P. Cleary, Rochester; Vice-President, William S. Bull, Buffalo; Secretary and Treasurer, William Coughlin, Troy.

The foregoing report was, after discussion, adopted in its entirety and without amendment. On motion of Chief Cassada, the chair was empowered to name a committee to act as a board of governors and auditing committee. Pursuant to such authorization the chair named Superintendent Bull of Buffalo, and Chiefs Cassada of Elmira, and McMaster of Auburn, to serve respectively, three, two, and one years, each.

On motion of Superintendent Bull of Buffalo, the chair was authorized to appoint a committee of five to prepare a constitution and by-laws. In pursuance of such authority the chair designated as such committee: Superintendent Bull, of Buffalo, Chiefs Cassada, of Elmira; Coughliin, of Troy; Ryan, of Tonawanda; Molyneux, of Lockport.

Superintendent Bull suggested that the scope of the association be fixed in a definite manner. A rule on this subject would be a great aid to the committee on constitution in its labors.

On motion of Chief Molyneux, of Lockport, it was decided that the membership of the organization consist of the salaried superintendents and chiefs of police of the several incorporated cities and villages of the State.

After the close of the business meeting the members witnessed an exhibition of a new burglar alarm invented by S. Schwartschild of Rochester. Subsequently the members were the guests of Chief Cleary and visited many places of interest in that beautiful city.

The next regular meeting was held at Utica, New York, April 8, 1902.

There were present at this meeting the following Chiefs of Police, William S. Bull, Buffalo, William Coughlin, Troy; Thomas Barry, Rome; J. F. Ryan, North Tonawanda; Frank J. Cassada, Elmira; Charles Molyneux, Lockport; E. Barnes, Cortland; M. J. Hickey, Hornellsville; Charles E. McMaster, Auburn; Fred C. Treat, Johnstown; August Halling, Little Falls; J. Fred Sherber, Gloversville; James L. Hyatt, Albany; Charles J. McCabe, Poughkeepsie; William Moore, Binghamton; James Ryan, Corning; Daniel Kane, Geneva; Henry G. Beeman, Canandaigua.

These together with those present at the first meeting constitute the Charter Members of the Association in accordance with the resolution passed at the first meeting of the association. At this meeting it was decided to hold meetings of the association annually instead of quarterly as proposed at the first meeting, this rule is still in effect and meetings are now held annually.

The next meeting was held at Elmira, New York, November 29, 1902. At this meeting the following officers were re-elected to serve for the ensuring year: Joseph P. Cleary, President; William S. Bull, Vice-President and William Coughlin, Secretary and Treasurer.

The next meeting was held at Buffalo, New York, October 8, 1903. At this meeting the following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: William S. Bull, of Buffalo, President; Charles Molyneux of Lockport, Vice-President; William Coughlin of Tory, Secretary and Treasurer.

The next meeting was held at Binghamton, New York, October 27, 1904. At this meeting the following officers were elected to serve for the ensuring year: President Frank J. Cassada of Elmira; Vice-President, William Moore of Binghamton; Secretary and Treasurer, William Coughlin of Troy.

The next meeting was held at Albany, New York, September 12, 1905. At this meeting the following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Frank J. Cassada of Elmira; Vice-President, William Moore of Binghamton; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

Secretary and Treasurer William Coughlin declined the election.

The next meeting was held at Niagara Falls, New York, July 25, 1906. At this meeting the following officers were elected to serve for the ensuring year: President, William Moore of Binghamton; Vice President, Charles F. Cleveland of Utica; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

The next meeting was held at Rome, New York, August 7, 1907. This meeting was called to order by Secretary James L. Hyatt, who announced that since the last meeting, President William Moore, of Binghamton had died and also that Vice-president Charles F. Cleveland of Utica, was confined to his home by illness and therefore it would be necessary to select a temporary Chairman. Chief Charles Molyneux, of Lockport, was chosen as temporary chairman of the meeting. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuring year: President Charles Molyneux, of Lockport; Vice-President Charles F. Cleveland of Utica; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

The next meeting was held at Auburn, New York, August 4, 1908. This meeting was called to order by Secretary James L. Hyatt, who announced that since the last meeting President Charles Molyneux had died, also Vice-President Charles F. Cleveland had died, leaving the association without either president or vice-president, and that it would be necessary to select a temporary chairman. On motion, Frank J. Cassada of Elmira was selected to serve as temporary chairman of the meeting. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuring year: President, Thomas Barry of Rome; Vice-President, William C. Bell of Auburn; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

The next meeting was held at New York City, September 1, 1909. Owing to illness of President Barry, Vice-President Bell called the meeting to order. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, William C. Bell of Auburn; Vice-President, John Jamison of Cohoes; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

The next meeting was held at Schenectady, New York, August 30, 31, 1910. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, James Rynex of Schenectady; Vice-President, Joseph M. Quigley of Rochester; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

The next meeting was held at Rochester, New York, June 13, 1910. On account of the meeting of the International Association of Chiefs of Police being held at the same time at Rochester, it was resolved unanimously to suspend collection of dues for the year 1911. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Charles H. Goodrich of Binghamton; Vice-President, James J. Long of Little Falls; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany.

It was resolved to meet in 1912 at Binghamton, NY, the date to be fixed by the President.

The next meeting were held at Binghamton, NY, September 30 and October 21, 1912 The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Charles H. Goodrich of Binghamton; Vice-President, James J. Long of Little Falls; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany, NY. It was resolved to meet at Rochester, NY, in 1913, date to be fixed by the President.

The next meeting was held at Rochester, NY, October 6 and 7, 1913. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Michael Regan, Buffalo, NY; Vice-President, James J. Lane, Hudson, NY; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany, NY.

It was resolved to meet at Buffalo, NY, in 1914. Date to be fixed by the President.

The next meeting was held at Buffalo, NY, June 11, 12, and 13, 1914. The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Michael Regan, Buffalo, NY; Vice-President, James J. Lane, Hudson, NY; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany, NY.

It was resolved to meet at Watertown in 1915, and President Michael Regan declined to accept a renomination for President on account of the work attached to the Presidency of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, which position he was elected to at their Convention held at Cincinnati, Ohio, beginning May 25, 1915.

The following officers were elected to serve for the ensuing year: President, Edward J. Singleton, Watertown, NY; Vice-President, John T. Manion, Herkimer, NY; Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt of Albany, NY.

It was resolved to meet at Kingston in 1916. Date to be fixed by the President.

The next meeting was held at Kingston, NY, July 26 and 27, 1916, and President Singleton, Vice-President Manion, and Secretary and Treasurer, James L. Hyatt were re-elected, and Gillmore O. Bush of Tuxedo, NY, Sergeant-at Arms for the ensuing year. It was resolved to meet at Schenectady, NY, in 1917, date to be fixed by the President.

NEW YORK POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL In Charge of
Inspector Cornelius J. Cahalane

When Commissioner Arthur Woods became the head of New York's big force, one of the first things he did was to reconstruct the whole methods of police training. A close study of several years of existing conditions brought him to the conclusion that what the force needed, and needed quickly, was more training - a longer course of training for the recruits and specialized training for every rank of the service.

Let us look over some of the reasons for this. Foremost of all is the fact that although its police force is only half the size of London's, New York is now the largest city in the word. It has 315 square miles to be patrolled; 5,000 miles of streets and highways. Its 445 miles of water front, holding millions of dollars worth of property in various stages of transit, must be kept free from river pirates by patrol boats. In some of the congested sections there are more persons living on one block than there are in many thriving cities. Many blocks on the East Side each contain more than 3,500 residents. In the block bounded by 61st and 62nd Streets, Amsterdam to West End Avenue, there are more than 8,000 negroes living in tenements.

The population of the city is about 6,000,000, of which more than 2,000,000 - one third - were born 'on the other side.'

These immigrants bring with them customs of their fatherland which often innocently lead them into violations of the law here. Freedom from persecution is only too often construed as freedom from all civic responsibility. In precincts where the foreign element predominates, a patrolman must be tactful and well trained so that he may correct by explanation and warning conditions which otherwise would have to be remedied by expensive court action. In addition, just as New York offers the most promising field for the efforts of the cleverest in every profession, so does it appeal to the sharpest of those who live by their wits - who come, attracted by the big money. The crooks, from dip to wiretapper, have been forced to newer and cleverer tricks to keep abreast of the times. They have availed themselves of every invention of science to further their ends. These conditions must be met by more scientific police instruction.

The fist thing Commissioner Woods did was to change the title of the School of Recruits to 'The Training School.' The change was significant. Police training, which had heretofore been confined to a six-weeks course of instruction for the recruits, was broadened to take in every branch of police service.

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